Day Schedule to aid Transition Times

One strategy in aiding classroom management and reducing transition times is to have a day plan posted detailing the upcoming events.  This visual display aids students in knowing what is expected and at what times.   Helping students organize their time is an essential skill.  Through demonstrating that plans are in place, students know that you are organized and they will strive to be as well.  We have prepared a Customizable Day Schedule for you to display for your class.  There are 4 themes available (stars, stripes, polka dots & swirls), but should you need any other theme please communicate with us (tradmin@teachingrocks.ca) and we will definitely help you out! Click on the links below to find our products

New Addition to “Your Essential Teacher Binder”: Ocean Theme!

What is “Your Essential Teacher Binder”? We’ve all heard of the famous “teacher binder” that contains everything that you need to run your class and lessons successfully! It is essential to your teaching, but not everything fits into the three rings of a binder, so we added in a few resources for your classroom too! We like to think of “Your Essential Teacher Binder” as a collection of teacher resources to help you organize both your teaching and your classroom.

All teachers have various ways of organizing their lessons, plans, and classrooms; however, we have grouped together a great set of resources to assist you in this endeavor!

So what’s included in this classroom kit? There are more than 70 pages featuring:
– Desk nameplates (2/sheet) for both upper and lower grades
– Student hook/cubby nameplates (6/sheet) that can also be used to label bins etc
– Hall pass, office pass, and washroom pass
– Bookmarks (4/sheet) with “During Reading” suggestions
– Monthly student behavior log (2/sheet)
– “While You Were Absent” sheet for students
– Classroom job labels (30 different jobs to choose from!)
– Student of the Month an d Week (upper and lower grades)
– Student Birthday Postcards (2/sheet)
– Lesson plan monthly cover pages
– Classroom calendar monthly labels for both upper and lower grades
– Subject area cover pages for lesson and unit plans
– Substitute teacher feedback form
– Professional development log and Staff meeting record sheet
– Parent contact log (individual student)
– Month at a glance, Monthly plan at a glance, Week at a glance
– Individual student and whole class information sheet (5 students/sheet)
– End of the year classroom inventory
– Lesson plan and mark book cover page

We have tried to include as many printables that we could think of, but if you have any suggestions, please let us know and we’ll add them in!

These kits come in a variety of themes, including outer space, aliens, polka dots, swirls, monsters, apples, and now…oceans!

 

Strategies for Basic Addition Facts

We are always struggling with moving our students along the learning continuum.  We have a wide array of curriculum to teach.  When it comes to Mathematics and the acquisition of this amazing subject, we must be able to decompose the facts and their strategies before we are able to teach it to our students.  We are skilled and have great knowledge but sometimes it is difficult to revert back down to the basics.  We must teach addition facts in their most simplest forms.  Studies show that students will be more successful when these basic addition facts are acquired in the proper order.  I have provided a quick description of each one with an example of how to demostrate and teach that fact.   Print it out (link below) and keep it in your teacher binder.  Even if you teach higher than grade 3, you never know when you will be teaching a student who has learning gaps that you will need to address.  Addition Fact Strategies

 

Strategies to Make Transition Times Smooth!

How long does it take to settle your class down and focus when coming in at the beginning of the day, after recess or lunch, or between rotary periods?  How about when switching from one lesson to another?  When these transitions happen, we as educators lose very essential on task time and gain off task behaviours.  Obviously, we all know that these disruptions are normal up to a certain point and we cannot expect not to have some time lost.  But how much time is too much?  That answer is based on what you find acceptable in your own classroom.

Nevertheless, there are many strategies available to help us diminish the lost time and create effective classrooms.  Organization and routine are essential keys.  This means that we as teachers must know what we expect, where we want to go with our lessons, and how to communicate that information to our students.  For effective classrooms we need to consider all essential times to establish routines with our students.  As always nothing is set in stone.  We should be able to reflect and adapt. When things don’t work revisit these points to help you through the process.

Strategies:

~ Clearly outline your expectations from students at the beginning of the year.  Working on     them collaboratively ensures ownership of actions.

~ As a class, at the beginning of the year, develop activities/signals to indicate transition times.  This can be accomplished by playing a specific piece of music (at your accepted length of time), calling out their names one by one, counting to a specific number, ringing a bell, creating an incentive for the class to reward the quickest time. This is should be alternated to address all the different learning styles of your classroom.

~ Practice transitions through modeling and repetition. Show the students desired and undesired behaviors.

~ When students are successful, utilize appropriate teacher language to hi light your recognition of the desired behaviour.

~ Have a daily outline of your schedule for students to visualize what is coming and at what time.

~ If possible, plan for longer periods of non transition.  This usually can be done by preparing cross curricular lessons; therefore students do not need to “switch gears” but definitely prepare shorter tasks to keep students interested

~ When you need to have an in class transition give students a “heads-up” before it is going to occur.  This can be accomplished by a visual timer on a Smart Board, or by writing how many minutes left on the blackboard.

~ Quick transitions could be also done by asking students to repeat instructions back to you.

~ Set up quick tasks to get students to settle down as soon as they come in.  Have sheets set up in trays & students can easily pick them up.  These can be quick math skills practice, journaling, and multiple choice questions. These can be review or pre cursors to past or upcoming lessons.

~ Have music playing when entering into the classroom to help settle students and to indicate they should be prepared.

~ Organize a system to collect and distribute classroom assignments and homework (classroom helpers, drop box, mailbox for each student, in box, out box).

Helping Solve the Problem of Problem Solving

Students always have problems with communicating their thoughts, their steps in solving a mathematical problem and their findings.  I have found that using the G.R.A.S.S. method ensures students communicate all they are thinking.  This acronym helps them streamline their thoughts and organizes their plan of attack into smaller sub- sections.   When reading through their solution we, as educators, can quickly see their processes and their thoughts.

We have utilized this method in preparing students for EQAO (Ontario’s version of Standardized Testing). 

 

Here is a brief description of what the acronym G.R.A.S.S. stands for…

Given           Required            Analysis           Solution            Statement 

We have created a complete package for you!  Click on the picture and you will find a a complete description for the use of this method, a poster set for your classroom (anchor charts), a student response sheet (reproducible), and a sample problem with a response utilizing this method. 

We hope that this will be helpful for you and your students.

“Your Essential Teacher Binder” now on sale!

What is “Your Essential Teacher Binder”? We’ve all heard of the famous “teacher binder” that contains everything that you need to run your class and lessons successfully! It is essential to your teaching, but not everything fits into the three rings of a binder, so we added in a few resources for your classroom too! We like to think of “Your Essential Teacher Binder” as a collection of teacher resources to help you organize both your teaching and your classroom.

All teachers have various ways of organizing their lessons, plans, and classrooms; however, we have grouped together a great set of resources to assist you in this endeavor!

So what’s included in this classroom kit?  There are more than 70 pages featuring:
– Desk nameplates (2/sheet) for both upper and lower grades
– Student hook/cubby nameplates (6/sheet) that can also be used to label bins etc
– Hall pass, office pass, and washroom pass
– Bookmarks (4/sheet) with “During Reading” suggestions
– Monthly student behavior log (2/sheet)
– “While You Were Absent” sheet for students
– Classroom job labels (30 different jobs to choose from!)
– Student of the Month an d Week (upper and lower grades)
– Student Birthday Postcards (2/sheet)
– Lesson plan monthly cover pages
– Classroom calendar monthly labels for both upper and lower grades
– Subject area cover pages for lesson and unit plans
– Substitute teacher feedback form
– Professional development log and Staff meeting record sheet
– Parent contact log (individual student)
– Month at a glance, Monthly plan at a glance, Week at a glance
– Individual student and whole class information sheet (5 students/sheet)
– End of the year classroom inventory
– Lesson plan and mark book cover page

We have tried to include as many printables that we could think of, but if you have any suggestions, please let us know and we’ll add them in!

These kits come in a variety of themes, including outer space, aliens, polka dots, swirls, monsters, and apples!